A little less Squirrel? … A lot more action?

I am curious as to the opinion of people’s appreciation of the squirrel pictures on my blog, Throwing Down Acorns.  Please leave opinions as to the continued future of my squirrel visitors.  Thank you, Acorn Thrower

Advertisements

Turkey Day Delay

Vegetable-thanksgiving-turkey.jpg.696x0_q70_crop-smart

So the Vegan is cooking the Thanksgiving turkey at her home for friends.   Just because someone is a vegan, does not mean they were always a vegan.  I still have mad mad baking and chef skills.  For three years now I have been a vegetarian.  I am just now moving to full vegan.  Now that I am recently aware of the Veggie Bullet I can see myself a step closer to going fully raw.

The point of this post is to state the 2 of 5 Feminist Anthem post shall be delayed until next week due to me being the chef and a right fine knot in my neck which lead to a right fine head ache, now addressed and fading.  Happy Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving-Dinner-Substitute-Squirrel--104268

Squirrelly Goodness

If you have liked any of Throwing Down Acorns blog images, individual blogs, or thoughts, then please subscribe to my blog.  Please like the individual blogs. Please comment. Please post queries.  Thanks.8299514_orig

One of my favorite images

4665b0ae4665a4a27d271015a7ef22f3

Thank you for taking your time to read my blog

tumblr_mbysix7LE71rz9sizo1_500

I really like these sewn sugar skulls.

360214,xcitefun-flying-squirrel-4

 I will be posting weekly inspirations, as I am flying off to my writing corner to work on writing my book.

 

 

Día de Muertos …

flat,800x800,070,f.u8

Information  and images compiled by Acorn Thrower

“What’s …Día de los Muertos…?
Día de los Muertos — also known as “Día de Muertos,” or “Day of the Dead” in English — is a holiday with Mexican origins that is celebrated on November 1 – 2. … Día de los Muertos is a day to celebrate death — or, more specifically, the deceased —… Día de los Muertos has both indigenous origins from the Aztec festival for Mictecacihuatl, The Lady of The Dead, and Catholic origins from the Spanish conquistadors’ All Saints and All Souls Day.

 

dia de los muertos

Wait, it’s a two-day Holiday?
Yes, the original Aztec holiday was actually a month long event, but when the Spanish conquistadores arrived and turned Mexico Catholic, the celebration became intertwined with All Saints Day (Nov. 1) and All Souls Day (Nov. 2). Traditionally, Nov. 1 is when you welcome the souls of children that have passed away, known as Día de los Inocentes (Day of the Innocents) or Día de los Angelitos (Day of the Little Angels). Nov. 2 is when the adult souls arrive.

 

halloween2

How do you celebrate the dead?
Those who celebrate Día de los Muertos will usually put up altars honoring those members of the family who have passed away. They decorate the altars with candles, sugar skulls, marigolds, food, beverages and clothes. These offerings, or “ofrendas,” are gifts for the dead and are usually a combination of his or her favorite things. Like the holiday itself, the altar also has mixed imagery of both indigenous and Catholic background. The graves of the deceased are also visited and honored with offerings as well as vigils.

 

dia de los muertos altar

Would you have to go to Mexico to see these celebrations?
No, although Día de los Muertos is a Mexican National Holiday it is actually celebrated in other countries as well such as Guatemala, Brazil and Spain. It is also becoming more and more popular in the U.S. due to the large number of Mexican immigrants and Mexican Americans.

 

dia de los muertos

…Skulls?
Skulls are everywhere during Día de los Muertos. The origins trace back to the pre-Hispanic era, when they were kept as trophies and used during rituals.

 

La-Muerte

The most recognized skull on Dia de los Muertos is the Calavera Catrina. The image as we know it today originated with José Guadalupe Posada, a Mexican Artist who depicted a fancy female skeleton as a dig against the Europhile Mexican elite during the Porfirio Díaz dictatorship. It became an iconic image of the Mexican Revolution at the beginning of the twentieth century.

 

sug2

But the actual Catrina is said to have originated thanks to the Aztec tale of Mictecacihuatl, the Lady of the Dead.”

By Ana Maria Benedetti

Why is Día de los Muertos celebrated?

1-15-12-2-9-14-18m

“Assured that the dead would be insulted by mourning or sadness, Dia de los Muertos celebrates the lives of the deceased with food, drink, parties, and activities the dead enjoyed in life. Dia de los Muertos recognizes death as a natural part of the human experience, a continuum with birth, childhood, and growing up to become a contributing member of the community. On Dia de los Muertos, the dead are also a part of the community, awakened from their eternal sleep to share celebrations with their loved ones.
File-Sep-27-4-04-52-AM
The most familiar symbol of Dia de los Muertos may be the calacas and calaveras (skeletons and skulls), which appear everywhere during the holiday: in candied sweets, as parade masks, as dolls. Calacas and calaveras are almost always portrayed as enjoying life, often in fancy clothes and entertaining situations.”

tmp716109758821564417

 

“In many parts of Mexico, participants in Dia de los Muertos festivities wear shells or other noisemakers on their clothing and jewelry. Why?

Answers will vary! Consider the culture of the festival:
•    The dead are a part of the community, but invisible to the living. Shells and noisemakers will wake the dead from their sleep, and keep them close during the festivities.

flat,1000x1000,075,f.u2
•    Many of the dead were musicians or enjoyed music and dancing.
•    Dia de los Muertos is a celebration, and music is an important part of the joyous atmosphere.”

1477684992-JuanGaAltar01

“A Dia de los Muertos altar for Mexican singer Juan Gabriel, created by Amparo de Jesús Rincón Pérez, of the National Council for Culture and Arts in Mexico City, and officials from the Dallas Mexican Consulate, at the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center in Dallas.

It’s not even celebrated in all of Mexico.

Isabel Montemayor, assistant professor and research associate for the Center of Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas at Arlington, said it is not as common for places in northern Mexico to celebrate, compared with southern Mexico in states such as Michoacan, Oaxaca and Veracruz.

It’s not a depressing holiday.

Montemayor said it’s a misunderstanding that the tradition is somber because death is involved. It’s quite the opposite, actually.

muertos1

“It’s a celebration of life. That’s why you see the bright colors and music. Yes, there’s some solemnity about it, but at the same time it’s a celebration of the individuals who lived,” Montemayor said.

day-of-the-dead-mexico-DDLM1015

Ofrend

It’s not a shrine; it’s a very symbolic altar.

Shrines are usually sacred structures for a specific deity. Altars used for Dia de los Muertos are the centerpieces for the holiday.

 

e595248112357cfcfa33b1591cf7b373--day-of-dead-altars

Rincón said the altars can vary in levels, but they are typically three-tiered to symbolize heaven, purgatory and earth.

 

The bread is round for a reason.

Getty-Pan-de-Muerto-57f277873df78c690fe6bf2c

Pan de muerto, or bread of the dead, may sound off-putting. But it’s a common treat made at panaderias, or Hispanic bakeries, for the holiday. The pastry is round to symbolize the circle of life, Rincón said.

 

What is la ofrenda?

 

You may see prepared meals, cigarettes or even a bottle of tequila on some altars. Those items are a part of la ofrenda, or the offering, which is a gift for the dead. It’s usually items that the deceased enjoyed the most. During the holiday, it’s believed the dead can savor their favorite things again.

The holiday coincides with the end of the agricultural cycle. Indigenous pueblos in Mexico saw it as a time to give thanks for the year’s harvest and honor their ancestors.” dallasnews.com

 

 

s-l1000

For more on Día de los Muertos celebrations and tradition around the world go to Wikipedia.

rawImage

Día de los Muertos a woman dressed as a Caballero

 

ec50e7d99b865cb16856f868767c9d97

Calavera Catrina on a deck of playing cards.

dia-de-los-muertos-michoacan-journeymexcio

Honoring the ancestors

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

More stunning calavera face painting

eff1f35da474d67c4f42c24cc7bc145e

Let these fellas play us out

482a5de88ec04f6ad915568582fe70b4--animal-skeletons-strange-photos

One final ancestor to honor

 

Images scoured from the internet.  The images belong to the photograhers or source holders.  All source material has a link in the body of the text.  All rights reserved to original publications.  Thank you for allowing me to share your words and work.

 

All Saints Day was moved… How squirrelly? All Souls too…

A “Saintly” Squirrel in Stained Glass

All Saints day originally went my a different name, dedication Sanctae Mariae ad Martyres, based upon the pagan celebration of Lemuria both were held on May 13. “Some liturgiologists base the idea that this Lemuria festival was the origin of that of All Saints on their identical dates and on the similar theme of “all the dead”.” (Wikipedia All Saints Day)  Pope Gregory III in the mid-eighth century dedicated a day to the saints and their relics, November 1.

“The choice of the day may have been intended to co-opt the pagan holiday “Feast of the Lamures,” a day which pagans used to placate the restless spirits of the dead.  In Ireland All  Saints Day is celebrated on April 20th.  November 1 is all Saints Day, Tomorrow is All Souls Day.  I will cover both in this Blog as I will post it in the morning on All Souls day.

 

metairie_cemetery_new-weeping_angel_tomb_chapman_hyams

Weeping Angel in Holy Light

 

 

6153280059_21bd403f92_b

Weeping Angel During Day

 

All-Saints

A classic Depiction of “All Saints”

100 points if you can name them all.   I have a friend. Maria B. who can name them all.

I am going to start with and bit of Truth, as it is what the fundamental beleif of my faith, Druid.  Though I have been in a Roman Catholic Church in the past year.  Long ago I converted from Roman Catholiscism to Druid.  I have released all of my past knowledge of the religion that no longer lightened my soul.   Thus there will be numerous instanaces of exerpting from other sources.  As I have been researching this topic I have fallen utterly in love with the pictures of lights to honor the dead.

 

the-virgin-mary-with-the-apostles-and-other-saints-fra-angelico

“The Catholic practice celebrates all those who have entered heaven, including saints who are recognized by the Church and those who are not.”  Catholic.org

Of Course where you have a room full of a christians you will have a similar number of perspectives on what a holy day means, as well as how to celebrate the holy day.

 

saints_stained_glass

 

“According to Mark Wood at Christian Today many evangelical protestants are uncomfortable with saints as it seems to rank some Christians more highly than others.

Thus many Christians extend the celebration of All Saints Day to everyone who is a Christian. ‘We are all saints, in a biblical sense,’ he writes.

‘So All Saints Day is a time to be thankful for all those Christians who have lived before us, whether they are officially saints or not. Some are the great teachers ad prophets from history.

Some are those who’ve taught and inspired us personally. ‘Some are our friends and family. We can thank God for their witness, and for the way they have transmitted the faith down the generations. We can learn from their lives. We can take time to be grateful for what we’ve received, and to recommit ourselves to follow in their footsteps.’

Kenya Sinclair, a writer at Catholic Online, echoes this sentiment saying All Saints Day is a ‘call to live as saints’.”  Metro.co.uk

international-house-images-allsaints1

Prayer votive to the Saints

 

 

Fun Fact from Beliefnet.com

“New Orleans Saints

Did you know the New Orleans Saints was named after All Saints Day because of the huge Catholic population in New Orleans?”

 

Symbols for the Holy Days

Germans purely celebrate All Saints Day

All Saints’ Day is represented by paintings and images of many saints together. The saints may surround or look towards a figure representing Jesus and be accompanied by angels. Saints are often represented with a golden halo above or behind their heads.

 

Newweling-Kegel

Two or more candle wicks dipped in wax and wrapped around a cone-shaped form

 

Newweling

Newweling preburning

 

2011112706

Newweling Burning

In some areas of Germany, a Newweling symbolizes All Saints’ Day. A Newweling is made of two or more candle wicks dipped in wax and wrapped around a cone shaped form. The form is removed before the candle is lit. Traditionally, each candle wick is dipped in red, white, blue, yellow or green wax and two or more different colors are used for each candle.

Toussaint

Passy-Cemetery-Paris-06-©-French-Moments

“All Saints’ Day in France is locally known as “Toussaint” which is the contraction of “Tous les Saints”, meaning “All the Saints” in English. The solemnity takes place in Autumn on the 1st November and is a Catholic tradition of honouring the dead.

Pere-Lachaise-Cemetery-Paris-©-French-Moments

French people commemorate their dead on the 1st of November. The catholic tradition makes a distinction between Toussaint (All Saints’ Day, on the 1st of November) from the “Commémoration des fidèles défunts” (All Soul’s day, on the 2nd of November). Dead relatives are supposed to be commemorated on the 2nd of November, but since Toussaint is a public holiday, French people honour their dead on the 1st of November. Members of a family usually gather to go to the cemetery together.

 

Pere-Lachaise-Cemetery-06-copyright-French-Moments

They put chrysanthemum flowers on the grave and light candles to symbolise happiness in the afterlife.

 

Crypt-Saint-Michel-Bordeaux-©-French-Moments

They can also attend special church services.

 

Passy-Cemetery-Paris-05-©-French-Moments

Toussaint can be a very important moment for families. They can spend a day together in a respectful atmosphere which generally excludes usual family fights, even though regrets and sorrow can be a source of tension. Toussaint is an opportunity to strengthen family links spending a nice day together or expressing common grief.

Many different countries blur the lines of All Saints Day and All Souls Day, the Filipinos are another one of  these nationalities.

 

Undas or Undras

sitemgr_photo_3779

“Most Filipinos go to the cemetery to visit the graves of deceased relatives and friends. Some prefer to go on Oct. 31st or Nov. 1st, while some go to the cemetery for three straight days. Others would spend the night at their loved ones mausoleum. Once we arrive, we clean the tombs, light up candles, offer flowers, and say a prayer for the souls of the departed.”

 

 

november-2-2015-philippine-holiday

“During this time, schools are on their semester break so it is also an opportunity for families to spend time together. Children would play with their cousins as the adults would exchange stories and play cards or mahjong (a game that originated in China). Back in the 80s, flying kites and catching dragonflies were favorite activities among the young. Filipinos, known for their love of singing, also bring guitars to serve as a means of entertainment while at the cemetery.

 

cemetery

As lunchtime approaches, everyone sets the table for the various dishes cooked for that day. It usually includes the deceased loved one’s favorite dish. We place a plate of food in front of the tomb or grave as offering for the soul of our relatives and friends. Priests would also go around the cemetery to offer prayers and bless graves.”

 

All-Saints-Day-Philippines-5

“Many people go back to their home provinces for All Souls’ Day. If they can’t, they go to the church to light candles. Special masses are also held in memory of the departed.”

 

Manila-North-Cemetery-1101

“Aside from honoring the dead, Filipinos also use this time to unwind. “

Quoted text

Polish and Hungarian Catholics also seem to blur the lines of the two holidays.

Polish Wszystkich Swietych

“All Saints’ Day is celebrated solemnly in Poland. The first of November is a bank holiday during which people visit cemeteries and gather round their family graves, laying flowers and lighting candles.

all-saints-day-cemetery-in-pruszkow-poland

 

“The Roman Catholic tradition (Festum Omnium Sanctorum) honouring all saints, both known and unknown, is one of the most important Polish holidays. It was also recognized by the communist authorities of the Polish People’s Republic. They renamed it the “Day of the Dead” and treated it as a day of remembrance for the deceased.

People used to believe that on 1 November, the day the Church traditionally received offerings from believers to celebrate mass in memory of the dead, souls stuck in purgatory would roam around among the living.

 

SwietoZmarlych-2-14202453688-122f8e1bf4-o.jpg

Pagan beliefs and celebrations have survived to the present day in the Podlasie Voivodeship, historically part of the eastern Slavic lands. Forefathers’s Eve, a tradition pre-dating Christianity commemorating restless souls, is still celebrated in some regions. In many villages, food, drink and prayers are still offered to the souls that have to atone for their sins, to help ease their anger and make their journey to heaven more comfortable. The tradition of a feast during which bread, eggs and honey are consumed has also been preserved. According to one superstition, a spoon which falls to the ground should not be picked up as it is thought to have been snatched by a dead soul searching for food.

 

2-chelb polish bread

CHLEB SZWAJCARSKI aka. “bread of the dead”

In some villages in southern Poland, people continue to bake the “bread of the dead,” marked with a cross and prepared early enough so as not to torture souls which, it was believed, used ovens and chimneys as the shortest way to heaven. People used to share the “bread of the dead” with priests and beggars who would say a prayer for the dead.

 

All Saints’ Day is followed by the All Souls’ Day (Commemoratio Omnium Fidelium Defunctorum – Commemoration of All Deceased Believers). It was introduced by Odilio, an abbot from Cluny, in 993 to replace the pagan celebrations for the dead. Nowadays, on All Souls’ Day, Roman Catholics remember the dead and pray for their souls. The second of November is not a bank holiday in Poland, but practising Roman Catholics go to mass on that day.

m.5111_all-saints-dayPoland

On 1 and 2 November Polish cemeteries are alight with hundreds of thousands of candles. The flower traditionally associated with All Saints’ Day in Poland is chrysanthemum.”

KAROLINA KOWALSKA

 

 

Hungarian All Saints Day

Halottak Napja

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Hungarians lanterns honoring the holy days

 

ALL SOULS DAY

Celebrated on November 2nd

800px-Day_of_the_dead_at_mexican_cemetery_4

“All Souls’ Day is a Catholic tradition in which churches commemorate the dead by praying for their souls. Rituals include visiting family graves and remembering deceased relatives. However, this Christian holiday combines some rituals from the Pagan holiday Samhain as well as ancient Mexican traditions used to celebrate and remember dead ancestors.”

File-Sep-27-4-04-52-AM

“Altars are set up in homes to honor dead relatives. These are adorned with food and drinks (ofrendas), photos, candles, flowers, and candy skulls inscribed with the name of the deceased. Incense sticks are lit to help the departed find their way.”

 

“What Is All Souls Day (Commemoration of the Faithful Departed)?

All Souls Day History, Information, Prayers, Meaning, Traditions, & More

What is All Souls Day? It is when the Church commemorates and prays for the souls in Purgatory, who are undergoing purification before entering heaven. All Souls Day is celebrated on November 2nd, the day after All Saints Day. Prayers: All Souls Day Prayers

 

‘Just the facts’

Liturgical Color(s): Black, White, or Violet
Type of Holiday: A Special Class; Ranked With Solemnities because it takes precedence over a Sunday
Time of Year: November 2 (West), Eve of Pentecost (East)
Duration: One Day
Celebrates/Symbolizes: All the faithful departed
Alternate Names: Commemoration of the Faithful Departed; Commemoratio omnium Fidelium Defunctorum
Scriptural References: 2 Maccabees 12:44-45; Matthew 12:31-32; 1 Corinthians 3:13-15; 2 Timothy 1:16-18; 1 Peter 3:18-20

Data Points

All Souls Day directly follows All Saints Day, and commemorates the faithful departed, those individuals who die in God’s grace. Catholics believe that not everyone who is destined for heaven is immediately ready for the “Beatific vision,” i.e. the direct experience of God and his perfect nature in heaven, so they must be purified of “lesser faults,” and the effects of sin.

The Catholic Church calls this purification “purgatory.” The Catholic teaching on Purgatory essentially requires belief in two realities: 1. that there will be a purification of the souls of believers prior to entering heaven and 2. that the prayers and masses of the faithful in some way benefit those in the state of purification.

As to the duration, place, and exact nature of this purification, the Church has no official teaching or dogma, although Saint Augustine and others used fire as a way to explain the nature of the purification.

Many faithful Catholics, including Pope Benedict XVI, understand that Purgatory may be best thought of as an “existential state” as opposed to a temporal place (see Benedict’s Eschatology: Death and Eternal Life 230-231).

In other words, because Purgatory is outside created time and space, it is not necessarily accurate to speak of a location or duration of Purgatory. Nonetheless, the prayers and Masses of the faithful do have an impact on the purification that the faithful are undergoing in Purgatory. Many non-Catholics, including C.S. Lewis, have believed in Purgatory, and the official dogma of Purgatory is hardly offensive, even if the popular understanding of it has led to confusion. As a more everyday explanation, many liken Purgatory to a place or state where one gets “cleaned up” before entering into the presence of Almighty God.

The Church prays for, and remembers, the faithful departed throughout the entire year. However, All Souls is the general, solemn, day of commemoration, when the Church remembers, prays for, and offers requiem masses up for the faithful departed in the state of purification. Typically Christians will take this day to offer prayers up on behalf of their departed relatives and friends. Others may remember influential individuals that they never knew personally, such as presidents, musicians, etc. This may be done in the form of the Office of the Dead (Defunctorum officium), i.e. a prayer service offered in memory of departed loved ones. Often this office is prayed on the anniversary (or eve) of the death of a loved one, or on All Souls’ Day.

There are many customs associated with All Souls Day, and these vary greatly from culture to culture. In Mexico they celebrate All Souls Day as el dia de los muertos, or “the day of the dead.” Customs include going to a graveyard to have a picnic, eating skull-shaped candy, and leaving food out for dead relatives. The practice of leaving food out for dead relatives is interesting, but not exactly Catholic Theology. If all of this seems a little morbid, remember that all cultures deal with death in different manners. The Western aversion to anything related to death is not present in other cultures.

In the Philippines, they celebrate “Memorial Day” based loosely on All Souls Day. Customs include praying novenas for the holy souls, and ornately decorating relatives’ graves. On the eve of All Souls (i.e. the evening of All Saints Day), partiers go door-to-door, requesting gifts and singing a traditional verse representing the liberation of holy souls from purgatory. In Hungary the day is known as Halottak Napja, “the day of the dead,” and a common custom is inviting orphans into the family and giving them food, clothes, and toys. In rural Poland, a legend developed that at midnight on All Souls Day a great light shone on the local parish. This light was said to be the holy souls of departed parishioners gathered to pray for their release from Purgatory at the altars of their former earthly parishes. After this, the souls were said to return to scenes from their earthly life and work, visiting homes and other places. As a sign of welcome, Poles leave their windows and doors ajar on the night of All Souls Day. All of these customs show the wide variety of traditions related to All Souls Day.

‘A bit of History’

Christians have been praying for their departed brothers and sisters since the earliest days of Christianity. Early liturgies and inscriptions on catacomb walls attest to the ancientness of prayers for the dead, even if the Church needed more time to develop a substantial theology behind the practice. Praying for the dead is actually borrowed from Judaism, as indicated in 2 Maccabees 12:41-42. In the New Testament, St Paul prays for mercy for his departed friend Onesiphorus (2 Timothy 1:18). Early Christian writers Tertullian and St. Cyprian testify to the regular practice of praying for the souls of the departed. Tertullian justified the practice based on custom and Tradition, and not on explicit scriptural teaching. This demonstrates that Christians believed that their prayers could somehow have a positive effect on the souls of departed believers. Closely connected to the ancient practice of praying for the dead is the belief in an explicit state called purgatory. The New Testament hints at a purification of believers after death. For example, Saint Paul speaks of being saved, “but only as through fire” (1 Corinthians 3:15). Over time, many Church Fathers, including St. Augustine, e.g. in Enchiridion of Faith, Hope, and Love and City of God, further developed the concept of a purgation of sins through fire after death.

‘A bit More History’

In the early Church, departed Christians’ names were placed on diptychs. In the sixth century, Benedictine communities held commemorations for the departed on the feast of Pentecost. All Souls’ Day became a universal festival largely on account of the influence of Odilo of Cluny in AD 998, when he commanded its annual celebration in the Benedictine houses of his congregation. This soon spread to the Carthusian congregations as well. The day was celebrated on various days, including October 15th in 12th century Milan. Today all Western Catholics celebrate All Souls’ Day on November 2, as do many Anglicans, Lutherans, and other Christians. Initially many Protestant reformers rejected All Souls’ Day because of the theology behind the feast (Purgatory and prayers/masses for the dead), but the feast is now being celebrated in many Protestant communities, in many cases with a sub-Catholic theology of Purgatory. Some Protestants even pray for the dead; many Anglican liturgies include such prayers. While the Eastern Churches lack a clearly defined doctrine of Purgatory, they still regularly pray for the departed. …”

5174350622_a594af9416_b

Hand made paper machete lantern

 

allsouls_sidebar

An All Souls Day Festival

 

 

4013081028_20777a2aa9_b

The Dearly Departed watching over the families who have come to visit

Halloweeen… A modern Haunt from Spirits Long Past

 

 

what-to-do-with-pumpkins-after-halloween-2

I saw this and had to share her with you!  Quiet the Trickster.

Curious Cat Interupting the Cannibal's dinner

You will be next my furry friend!

 Nom Nom Nom!

 

the-squirrel-eating-a-pumpkin-3

 Squirrel Performing a Lobotomy

 

double-face-jack-o-lantern

Gods it sucks when my skin shrinks off of my skull, ….. soooo PAinFul!

Though not as bad a being conscious during a lobotomy?

 

extremejackolanterns14

Man it is better than  Chthulu breaking out of your skin.

 

 d1d44588a3d31b8853b8a7c11cf2fe7e--sint-maarten-jack-o-lantern

  Or turning into a demon

 

 

article-2222449-15A80E4F000005DC-784_634x480

 This interaction eventually became a superb news article, …err photo opp.

 

bdfd106485dfc1049d63a9d4f95b22df

 Here is the haunting news picture.

 

tiger squirrel

Almost as scary as the zombie squirrel is this lion squirrel.

 

mistletoe

Though this Zombie squirrel is Terrifying maybe more so than the lion.

 

grim-reaper-halloween-maze

 I thought this was Spooky Cool.

 

 

Many perspectives exist on Halloween’s formidable and sacred history.  Honestly as a Druid the one that feels the most true in my bones is from “Tlachtga: Celtic Fire Festival” by John Gilroy excerpted by newgrange.com. Here is part of the article that is on Newgrange.com

Tlachtga where the Great Fire Festival at Samhain was celebrated
Tlachtga where the Great Fire Festival at Samhain was celebrated.

As millions of children and adults participate in the fun of Halloween on the night of October 31st, few will be aware of its ancient Celtic roots in the Samhain (Samain) festival. In Celtic Ireland about 2,000 years ago, Samhain was the division of the year between the lighter half (summer) and the darker half (winter). At Samhain the division between this world and the otherworld was at its thinnest, allowing spirits to pass through.

The family’s ancestors were honoured and invited home whilst harmful spirits were warded off. People wore costumes and masks to disguise themselves as harmful spirits and thus avoid harm. Bonfires and food played a large part in the festivities. The bones of slaughtered livestock were cast into a communal fire, household fires were extinguished and started again from the bonfire. Food was prepared for the living and the dead, food for the ancestors who were in no position it eat it, was ritually shared with the less well off.

Christianity incorporated the honouring of the dead into the Christian calendar with All Saints (All Hallows) on November 1st, followed by All Souls on November 2nd. The wearing of costumes and masks to ward off harmful spirits survived as Halloween customs. The Irish emigrated to America in great numbers during the 19th century especially around the time of famine in Ireland during the 1840’s. The Irish carried their Halloween traditions to America, where today it is one of the major holidays of the year. Through time other traditions have blended into Halloween, for example the American harvest time tradition of carving pumpkins.

Two hills in the Boyne Valley were associated with Samhain in Celtic Ireland, Tlachtga and Tara. Tlachtga was the location of the Great Fire Festival which begun on the eve of Samhain (Halloween). Tara was also associated with Samhain, however it was secondary to Tlachtga in this respect.

The entrance passage to the Mound of the Hostages on the Hill of Tara is aligned with the rising sun around Samhain. The Mound of the Hostages is 4,500 to 5000 years old, suggesting that Samhain was celebrated long before the first Celts arrived in Ireland about 2,500 years ago.

Celtic Earth Works on the Hill of Tara
Celtic Earth Works on the Hill of Tara

The Diwali Festival

The Hindu Diwali (Divali, Deepavali) Festival known as the Festival of Lights occurs about the same time as Samhain. Diwali marks the Hindu New Year just as Samhain marks the Celtic New Year, could it be that Diwali and Samhain have a common root in antiquity?

Samhain / Halloween

An excerpt from Tlachtga: Celtic Fire Festival by John Gilroy.

The Festival of Samhain marked the end of the Celtic year and the beginning of the new one and as such can be seen to the equivalent of New Year’s Eve. We have seen how the Celts believed that night preceded day and so the festivities took place on the Eve of Samhain. There is no doubt that that this festival was the most important of the four Celtic Festivals. Samhain was a crucial time of year, loaded with symbolic significance for the pre-Christian Irish. The celebrations at Tlachtga may have had their origins in a fertility rite on the hill but it gathered to itself a corpus of other beliefs which crystallised at the great Fire Festival.

The perceptible, and apparent, decline in the strength of the sun at this time of year was a source of anxiety for early man and the lighting of the Winter Fires here symbolised mans attempt to assist the sun on its journey across the skies. Fire is the earthly counterpart of the sun and is a powerful and appropriate symbol to express mans helplessness in the face of the overwhelming sense of the decay of nature as the winter sets in.

Now the sun has descended into the realm of the underworld, the forces of the underworld were in the ascendency. The lord of the underworld, unfettered from the control of the sun, now walked the earth and with him travelled all those other creatures from the abode of the dead. Ghosts, fairies and a host of other non-descript creatures went with him. The Lord of the Dead in Celtic mythology can be identified as Donn.

Mythology tells us that when the invaders of Ireland known as the Miliseans landed at the Boyne, they made their way to Tara. Once there, they were advised by the Druids that they should return to their ships and sail off the shore to the length of nine waves. When they were on the sea a great storm arose which scattered their fleet. The commander of one of the ships was Donn. His ship was broken to pieces in the storm and he himself drowned along with twenty four of his comrades. He was buried on the Skellig Islands off the coast of Kerry.

Thanks  and many blessings too Newgrange.com for providing this profound article.

 

Spiorad na Samhna — Origins of Halloween

This short Irish film traces origins of Ireland’s biggest Halloween Carnival in Derry back to troubled years of 1980s. It also traces origins of Halloween to the Celtic festival of Samhain.
From Livescience.comHistory of  Halloween by Benjamin Radford, Live Science Contributor | September 18, 2017 10:40pm ETHalloween is the season for little ghosts and goblins to take to the streets, asking for candy and scaring one another silly. Spooky stories are told around fires, scary movies appear in theaters and pumpkins are expertly (and not-so-expertly) carved into jack-o’-lanterns.Recently, creepy clowns seem to be doing some real terrorizing: In August of 2016, locals in Greenville, South Carolina, reported a clown who was allegedly trying to lure children into the woods; then in September, a teen reported a knife-wielding clown in Summitville, Tennessee. Local and state officials in many areas urged people to report suspicious clown sightings. And in South Florida, some stores pulled clown costumes from their shelves and Broward County police advised people not to dress up as the masked grinners, according to the Miami Herald.In 2017, the clowning continued. A movie based on the classic Steven King story “It” was remade and released in the United States on Sept. 8. In the movie, a demon that takes the form of a clown lures children into the sewer with a red balloon. In Lititz, Pennsylvania, police responded to reports of over 20 red balloons tied to sewer grates, according to CBS News. People dressing as clowns remains a popular way to scare. Children in North Dakota, for example, were targeted in May by a knife-wielding clown with a boa constrictor and in September, Australia saw an increase of clown sightings before Halloween.Amid the silly and scary antics, Halloween is much more than just costumes and candy; in fact, the holiday has a rich and interesting history.SamhainHalloween, also known as All Hallows’ Eve, can be traced back about 2,000 years to a pre-Christian Celtic festival held around Nov. 1 called Samhain (pronounced “sah-win”), which means “summer’s end” in Gaelic, according to the Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries. [13 Halloween Superstitions & Traditions Explained]Because ancient records are sparse and fragmentary, the exact nature of Samhain is not fully understood, but it was an annual communal meeting at the end of the harvest year, a time to gather resources for the winter months and bring animals back from the pastures. Samhain is also thought to have been a time of communing with the dead, according to folklorist John Santino.”There was a belief that it was a day when spirits of the dead would cross over into the other world,” Santino told Live Science. Such moments of transition in the year have always been thought to be special and supernatural, he added.Halloween provides a safe way to play with the concept of death, Santino said. People dress up as the living dead, and fake gravestones adorn front lawns — activities that wouldn’t be tolerated at other times of the year, he said.But according to Nicholas Rogers, a history professor at York University in Toronto and author of “Halloween: From Pagan Ritual to Party Night” (Oxford University Press, 2003), “there is no hard evidence that Samhain was specifically devoted to the dead or to ancestor worship.”According to the ancient sagas, Samhain was the time when tribal peoples paid tribute to their conquerors and when the sidh [ancient mounds] might reveal the magnificent palaces of the gods of the underworld,” Rogers wrote. Samhain was less about death or evil than about the changing of seasons and preparing for the dormancy (and rebirth) of nature as summer turned to winter, he said.Though a direct connection between Halloween and Samhain has never been proven, many scholars believe that because All Saints’ Day (or All Hallows’ Mass, celebrated on Nov. 1) and Samhain, are so close together on the calendar that they influenced each other and later combined into the celebration now called Halloween.Costumes and trick-or-treatingThe tradition of dressing in costumes and trick-or-treating may go back to the practice of “mumming” and “guising,” in which people would disguise themselves and go door-to-door, asking for food, Santino said. Early costumes were usually disguises, often woven out of straw, he said, and sometimes people wore costumes to perform in plays or skits.The practice may also be related to the medieval custom of “souling” in Britain and Ireland, when poor people would knock on doors on Hallowmas (Nov. 1), asking for food in exchange for prayers for the dead.Trick-or-treating didn’t start in the United States until World War II, but American kids were known to go out on Thanksgiving and ask for food — a practice known as Thanksgiving begging, Santino said.”Mass solicitation rituals are pretty common, and are usually associated with winter holidays,” Santino said. While one tradition didn’t necessarily cause the others, they were “similar and parallel,” he said.Tricks and gamesThese days, the “trick” part of the phrase “trick or treat” is mostly an empty threat, but pranks have long been a part of the holiday.By the late 1800s, the tradition of playing tricks on Halloween was well established. In the United States and Canada, the pranks included tipping over outhouses, opening farmers’ gates and egging houses. But by the 1920s and ’30s, the celebrations more closely resembled an unruly block party, and the acts of vandalism got more serious.Some people believe that because pranking was starting to get dangerous and out of hand, parents and town leaders began to encourage dressing up and trick-or-treating as a safe alternative to doing pranks, Santino said.However, Halloween was as much a time for festivities and games as it was for playing tricks or asking for treats. Apples are associated with Halloween, both as a treat and in the game of bobbing for apples, a game that since the colonial era in America was used for fortune-telling.  Legend has it that the first person to pluck an apple from the water-filled bucket without using his or her hands would be the first to marry, …read moreChristian/Irish InfluenceSome evangelical Christians have expressed concern that Halloween is somehow satanic because of its roots in pagan ritual. However, ancient Celts did not worship anything resembling the Christian devil and had no concept of it. In fact, the Samhain festival had long since vanished by the time the Catholic Church began persecuting witches in its search for satanic cabals. And, of course, black cats do not need to have any association with witchcraft to be considered evil — simply crossing their path is considered bad luck any time of year.As for modern Halloween, Santino, writing in “American Folklore: An Encyclopedia” (Garland, 1996), noted that “Halloween beliefs and customs were brought to North America with the earliest Irish immigrants, then by the great waves of Irish immigrants fleeing the famines of the first half of the nineteenth century.  …read moreAuthor BioBenjamin Radford, Live Science ContributorBenjamin Radford is the Bad Science columnist for Live Science. He covers pseudoscience, psychology, urban legends and the science behind “unexplained” or mysterious phenomenon. Ben has a master’s degree in education and a bachelor’s degree in psychology. He is deputy editor of Skeptical Inquirer science magazine and has written, edited or contributed to more than 20 books, including “Scientific Paranormal Investigation: How to Solve Unexplained Mysteries,” “Tracking the Chupacabra: The Vampire Beast in Fact, Fiction, and Folklore” and “Investigating Ghosts: The Scientific Search for Spirits,” out in fall 2017. His website is http://www.BenjaminRadford.com.

Halloween_pumpkin_cake_2015

Jack O’ Lantern Cake

 

A powerful cadre of Nutty Wizards and Witches

 

360px-Jack-o'-Lantern_2003-10-31

Something Wicked this Way Comes

Hopefully this Jack o’Lantern will scare the Wickedness away

 

8ff51ee45177e635d573cc6ec935c7f0

Should the Pumpkin Fail then how about we go to a more traditional spirit ward?

 

So recently, as in a few days ago, I fell in love with the most magnificent tiny black cat I have ever beheld.  In honor of said cat I bring you my black cats of Halloween favored images

 

In Honor of the Best and ONLY Cat I will ever feel is Awesomamazing

 

 

halloween_raven_by_jerry8448-d839pii

I love Ravens

 

9c9c8405e3c019ddf74dbd62488e06b9

A little more squirrelly magic!

 

ea0b478d35cdc52558e52e59c781d7f9--sugar-bush-squirrels

Wizard really getting into her work.

 

bat

A Batty Pumpkin

 

 

1420712239224

Frankenpumpkin

 

 

Someone Took his Broom and Hat away!  RUN!     ……… no Really RUUUUUUN!

 

A beautifully illustrated Halloween story book with animals

 

Transformice.(Game).600.830758

spooky-night-halloween-wallpaper-wallpaper-1583604476

Better Watch out for Spirits

 

30213b6922a68cf18649b1991711b2d3--witch-hats-squirrels

Sexy-halloween-witch

Or Werewitches passing as Squirrels

 

 

80ee858552762be942b58817aa4419f1

Be sure to wear your costume to go undetected by EeVIL Spirits

 

So that you can go seeking treats in Safety

 

 

witch-witchcraft-34784486-500-375

May your Halloween be filled with Magic

 

 

cf47d1dbf49c330526127b0fad28c651--little-pumpkin-happy-halloween

 And be Happily Haunted
The Multifaith perspective on Halloween is under development as a new blog post.